Previously, we shared a post from Export Delaware on how US companies could benefit from exporting to Australia and New Zealand. For many businesses around Delaware and the Mid-Atlantic, backlash from the Coronavirus could mean opportunities in Australia. As many Australian and International media companies are reporting, there is a growing divide between Australia and China due to the Chinese handling of the Coronavirus.

The Australian Strategic Policy Institute had a recent article, China and Australia face off in irate and icy pandemic diplomacy, highlighting this growing divide. As noted by the article, this isn’t the only time Australia and China have had icy relations.

A new layer of snow has settled atop the iciness of Australia’s relations with China.

Beijing and Canberra bite and bicker over Covid-19. The words are hot but they speak of frigid relations.

The diplomatic dance is performed as a melee.

Australia launched the latest spat by calling for an independent international inquiry on the origins and development of the pandemic.

On 19 April, Marise Payne said Australia will ‘absolutely insist’ on the review and China must show ‘transparency’. The foreign minister said the international inquiry would be similar to past reviews into ‘egregious human rights issues’.

When I saw that interview—especially the ‘egregious’ comparison—my reaction was, ‘Wow, go to battle stations.’ Payne is a deliberate player with a safe pair of hands, more a low-key than high-note performer. From her, that was a head-kicking message: the government had decided to go in hard.

While diplomatic relations are always in an ebb and flow, this could be a good signal for those US businesses looking to expand into the Australian market.

Leave a reply